Quilt

Johnny Brenda's Presents

Quilt

Weekender, Hello Shark

Fri, March 4, 2016

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$10.00

This event is 21 and over

All shows are 21+ Proper I.D. required for admission

Quilt - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
Quilt
It’s not uncommon to form a band while in college, and that is exactly what Quilt did. Its founding members, Shane Butler and Anna Fox Rochinski were visual art students at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, but bonded over their mutual love of weird, experimental jams and classic pop harmonies. John Andrews joined the band as drummer after opening for every Quilt show on tour in 2009. Butler grew up in a “community with a lot of musical chanting” and Rochinski was “doing classical singing in choirs that had a lot of crazy harmonies. There’s a lot of repetitive, almost mantra stuff in our songs,” she adds. Quilt is a band with strong roots that formed at the apex of the point in your life when you’re thinking about your own art and what it all means.
Weekender - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Weekender
Weekender is an American psychedelic/dream-pop band established in Philadelphia by Derek Sheehan in 2013, self-releasing their debut EP, Spanish Peaks, early that year before it was picked up by the Brooklyn-based, independent label, PaperCup Music. The EP was well received by the indie blogosphere - featured by Interview, Diffuser, and made Reddit's “2013 Best Of” list. But, as often happens in the course of any young band’s early career, life can get in the way. The battle between a good-paying job and the time, and opportunity to be creative, can be a real juggling act. And so Weekender’s line up shifted over the past two years, yet during that time, the band, whoever was backing Sheehan, Weekender became the go-to Philadelphia band to support touring acts coming through town, such as Future Islands, The Growlers, Nothing, Surfer Blood, Israel Nash, Peace, and Field Report, while building their own strong, local following.

With a new line-up solidly intact, including Jesse Petas (drums, percussion), Steven Rosplock (Guitar, Vocals), Brendan McGeehan (Bass), and Dan Mudd (Synthesizer), Sheehan recorded a second EP, Floaty, Feeling Blue, set to arrive January 15 on PaperCup Music. The album was recorded at Fancy Time Studios, once again with Kyle “Slick” Johnson, with he and Sheehan sharing production credits on the record.

“Kyle and I work super well together, and I think the biggest part of our success in the studio, is our willingness to try different ideas with the songs,” stated Sheehan. “Kyle has a knack for fleshing out the strengths of a song, and it helps to have another pair of experienced ears, unafraid to make suggestions.

Floaty Feeling, Blue is a record of dreamy, textured pop tunes, soaked in psychedelic effects. As the band has shifted, the sound has progressed with the addition of heavy synthesizers. “I bought two ‘80s analogue synths, a June 106 and Prophet 600,” says Sheehan, “adding a lot of the finished tracks. The textures of the synths create space for guitar and vocals, and I really love how much is going on between the notes.”

Thematically, the record is about the connection between the human and the natural world. “The lyrics embody the balance we strike between the two, not only individually, but also with how we relate to one another in each world,” stated Sheehan. “The theme was not immediately apparent, but as the songs took form during the writing and recording process so did the meaning. I find that letting my subconscious mold songs as I write, is probably my favorite part about songwriting, and similarly in the studio. Being in the moment and letting things happen is what I love about it.”
Floaty Feeling, Blue is a natural progression for Weekender, Sheehan now surrounded by a group of musicians, ready to take his vision forward. The band will look to take their live show, which has built them a loyal local following in Philadelphia, on the road throughout 2016.
Hello Shark - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Hello Shark
Hello Shark’s Lincoln Halloran has the knack for making the most crushing verses feel heartwarming, simply because his eloquent expression raises the awareness that another human has experienced a similar feeling. September’s Delicate is Hello Shark’s first proper LP, and it promises to introduce Halloran and his introspective musings aptitude to brand new audiences.

Hello Shark began when a teenage Halloran moved from his home of Massachusetts to Vermont in 2006. He quickly recorded an amateur but heartfelt debut called Book Lungs and began touring the Northeast, slowly building a community web that would stretch to include Owen Ashworth (of Casiotone for the Painfully Alone and Advance Base), Rochester’s Attic Abasement, and the members of Brooklyn collective the Epoch.

A major breakthrough for Hello Shark arrived in July 2011 with the album Break Arms, which was released on New Hampshire label Burst & Bloom. Break Arms is a confessional classic that manages to be melancholy, self-critical, and hopelessly sentimental without hardly ever rising above a quiet murmur. Break Arms marks the first time that Halloran’s penchant for gorgeous and sparse compositions were clearly expressed, and a small but passionate fan base took notice. 2013’s HS forgoes the folky fragility of its predecessor for a bolder, more electric sound. Over the 11 tracks, Halloran comes off as considerably more self-assured though he continues to explore a gentle vulnerability.

Delicate is Hello Shark’s first release since moving to Philadelphia in 2014, as well as the first on Orindal. The change in location, in addition to the two year gap between releases, has manifested itself in an exploration of disco tones and pop production. At recent concerts, Halloran has performed several tracks off Delicate alone with a drum machine. The display has a distinct karaoke vibe: equipped with just a microphone, Halloran seems to mentally erase the crowd and sing from a deep and cool sanctuary within; it makes sense that in 2011 Halloran sang “heaven for me is karaoke.” Fortunately, this purity of expression endure on the final Delicate recordings. Pseudo-title track “Jackson Browne” reads as a tipsy reflection over a barebones beat; the chorus “baby I’m delicate” resembles a late-night disclosure shared beneath blankets with the lights out, when hearts can truly be bared. Later on “Drake Night,” which features vocals from Florist’s Emily Sprague, an encounter at a dance club allows Halloran to revisit a relationship. Floating through Delicate are the vocal and bass work of Free Cake for Every Creature’s Katie Bennett. Bennett offers an ethereal presence to many of the tracks, adding a soft counter-texture to Halloran’s serene warble, perhaps most prominently on the yearning “Fishing for Bats.” On the other hand, songs like “Danny” and “New Jersey” summon the twangy tones of early Hello Shark songs. This is in part due to the recording work of Attic Abasement’s Michael Rheinheimer at his Rochester home (Rheinheimer also recorded Break Arms in Savannah, Georgia). Also contributing to Delicate’s recording are Matthew and Keith Hampson of Philadelphia synth-pop outfit Power Animal.

The music that ends up meaning the most is often not discovered until too late. Nick Drake’s Pink Moon did not become a cult favorite until long after its creator’s death, Arthur Russell’s legacy has only become clear since his passing, and so on. Hello Shark’s Delicate recalls both Drake and Russell, but luckily we are able to experience its beauty in the present.
Venue Information:
Johnny Brenda's
1201 N. Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA, 19125
http://www.johnnybrendas.com/