Ought

R5 Presents

Ought

Hello Shark, Quit

Wed, October 15, 2014

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:15 pm

$12.00

This event is 21 and over

All shows are 21+ Proper I.D. required for admission

Ought - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
Ought
Ought came together in Montréal as a band of expatriates initially attracted by sense-sharpening Canadian winters and university tuition that doesn’t cost $40k a year. The city’s cultural scene – especially its independent music ethos and galvanizing radical politics – was the underlying attractor, however, and one they jumped right into. Guitarist and vocalist Tim Beeler, originally a folk musician hailing from New Hampshire, fell in with New Jersey native Matt May (keyboards) and Australian émigré Tim Keen (drums, violin) – the three of them began sharing an apartment that doubled as practice space, where they were soon joined by Portland OR transplant Ben Stidworthy on bass. Ought played its first show and recorded its first EP in the apartment’s largest bedroom, in the summer of 2012.

Ought is part of a vital and politically-engaged DIY arts community that has coalesced around one of the loft spaces at the northern limit of Montreal’s Mile End district in recent years (the same zone that incubated Constellation almost 20 years ago). The four band members are, unsurprisingly, participants in a half-dozen other music projects. Various members have also worked with Montreal’s fearless and beloved CKUT radio and the Howl! Arts Collective.

Additional Ought history comes by way of the band’s own account:

It’s hard to talk about how the band came to be without talking about Loose-Fit, the Brasserie, and The Femmaggots. Loose-Fit was (and is) booking shows out of a local mainstay-type bar in Petit-Patrie called Brasserie Beaubien. This empowered a lot of people to be adventurous with new projects, and also it being always pay-what-you-can and chilled out and a publicly accessible venue (versus a loft-type situation where the address can’t be posted)—basically, it was (is) a Good Thing Going On. The Femmaggots were (are) our friends (and, some, housemates) at the time and besides being near and dear and fucking great people, they inspired a lot of others to start making music—many in this weird kind of punk-esque/political/wordy/funny world that we were also really into.

SO…the Femmaggots, plus the Brasserie made for a slowly expanding spiral of great music happening, plus actively bringing in lots of other groups that we didn’t know about + hooking up with great people coming through town. More Than Any Other Day definitely came out of this environment (and coming to terms with working varying degrees of bad jobs, etc), but also Quebec during the student strike, which was a total lid-off type situation that we were all really affected by. Meeting + playing with all these amazing people is really the story of the band, having never really gotten hype’d or even making physical releases and just really playing lots and being excited and thankful for the opportunity to keep playing and having a true fucking blast at shows, as they say.

Following another recording session in early 2013 and the release of a second EP via Bandcamp, Ought spent a few days at the Hotel2Tango studio with engineer Radwan Moumneh (Suuns, Matana Roberts, Jerusalem In My Heart) in fall 2013 at the invitation of Constellation, laying down a clutch of songs new and old that comprise the band’s first “proper” full-length album. More Than Any Other Day was released to critical acclaim on April 29, 2014.
Hello Shark - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Hello Shark
Hello Shark’s Lincoln Halloran has the knack for making the most crushing verses feel heartwarming, simply because his eloquent expression raises the awareness that another human has experienced a similar feeling. September’s Delicate is Hello Shark’s first proper LP, and it promises to introduce Halloran and his introspective musings aptitude to brand new audiences.

Hello Shark began when a teenage Halloran moved from his home of Massachusetts to Vermont in 2006. He quickly recorded an amateur but heartfelt debut called Book Lungs and began touring the Northeast, slowly building a community web that would stretch to include Owen Ashworth (of Casiotone for the Painfully Alone and Advance Base), Rochester’s Attic Abasement, and the members of Brooklyn collective the Epoch.

A major breakthrough for Hello Shark arrived in July 2011 with the album Break Arms, which was released on New Hampshire label Burst & Bloom. Break Arms is a confessional classic that manages to be melancholy, self-critical, and hopelessly sentimental without hardly ever rising above a quiet murmur. Break Arms marks the first time that Halloran’s penchant for gorgeous and sparse compositions were clearly expressed, and a small but passionate fan base took notice. 2013’s HS forgoes the folky fragility of its predecessor for a bolder, more electric sound. Over the 11 tracks, Halloran comes off as considerably more self-assured though he continues to explore a gentle vulnerability.

Delicate is Hello Shark’s first release since moving to Philadelphia in 2014, as well as the first on Orindal. The change in location, in addition to the two year gap between releases, has manifested itself in an exploration of disco tones and pop production. At recent concerts, Halloran has performed several tracks off Delicate alone with a drum machine. The display has a distinct karaoke vibe: equipped with just a microphone, Halloran seems to mentally erase the crowd and sing from a deep and cool sanctuary within; it makes sense that in 2011 Halloran sang “heaven for me is karaoke.” Fortunately, this purity of expression endure on the final Delicate recordings. Pseudo-title track “Jackson Browne” reads as a tipsy reflection over a barebones beat; the chorus “baby I’m delicate” resembles a late-night disclosure shared beneath blankets with the lights out, when hearts can truly be bared. Later on “Drake Night,” which features vocals from Florist’s Emily Sprague, an encounter at a dance club allows Halloran to revisit a relationship. Floating through Delicate are the vocal and bass work of Free Cake for Every Creature’s Katie Bennett. Bennett offers an ethereal presence to many of the tracks, adding a soft counter-texture to Halloran’s serene warble, perhaps most prominently on the yearning “Fishing for Bats.” On the other hand, songs like “Danny” and “New Jersey” summon the twangy tones of early Hello Shark songs. This is in part due to the recording work of Attic Abasement’s Michael Rheinheimer at his Rochester home (Rheinheimer also recorded Break Arms in Savannah, Georgia). Also contributing to Delicate’s recording are Matthew and Keith Hampson of Philadelphia synth-pop outfit Power Animal.

The music that ends up meaning the most is often not discovered until too late. Nick Drake’s Pink Moon did not become a cult favorite until long after its creator’s death, Arthur Russell’s legacy has only become clear since his passing, and so on. Hello Shark’s Delicate recalls both Drake and Russell, but luckily we are able to experience its beauty in the present.
Quit - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Quit
QUIT is a band from Philadelphia. Mostly we enjoy dogs and treasure hunts.
Venue Information:
Johnny Brenda's
1201 N. Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA, 19125
http://www.johnnybrendas.com/