New Year's Eve with The Districts

Johnny Brenda's Presents

New Year's Eve with The Districts

Lithuania, Pine Barons

Sun, December 31, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$25.00

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

All shows are 21+ Proper I.D. required for admission

The Districts - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
The Districts
It's not uncommon for musicians to grow and evolve between releases -- but even by those standards, the Districts' Popular Manipulations is stunning. The Pennsylvania-borne band's third full-length represents an exponential leap in sound and cohesion, an impressive and impassioned burn with a wide scope that threatens to swallow everything else surrounding it. Perhaps it's a cliché to say so, but while listening, you might find yourself wondering why people don't make indie rock like this anymore.

The total electric charge of Popular Manipulations is just the latest evolution for the impressively young quartet, whose founding members -- vocalist/guitarist Rob Grote, bassist Connor Jacobus, and drummer Braden Lawrence -- have known each other since attending grade school together in the Pennsylvania town of Lititz. After deciding to form a band in high school, the Districts gigged hard in the tri-state area, releasing a slew of promising material (including the rootsy 2012 debut Telephone) before catching the eye of venerable indie Fat Possum. 2015's A Flourish and a Spoil found the band refining their embryonic sound with veteran producer John Congleton (St. Vincent, Kurt Vile) -- and looking back on that release, there are glimmers of Popular Manipulations in chrysalis form to be found on it, hints of the fence-swinging anthemic sound they'd soon make wholly their own.

After touring behind A Flourish and a Spoil, Grote began "playing with different ideas" in his own songwriting by making demos at a prolific pace. "We knew that we wanted to change some things musically, so we were trying to come up with as many songs as possible to narrow the direction we wanted to take the material," he states. In total, they ended up with 50 song ideas, and so they were off to LA in May of 2016 with new guitarist Pat Cassidy in tow to log more recording time with Congleton, with four of Popular Manipulations' songs coming out of the sessions.

"We have a lot of overlapping tastes and preferences for how things are made," Grote gushes about working with the notably reliable studio wizard -- but acceding all credit to Congleton (who also handled the record's mixdown) would be shortchanging the Districts themselves, who went on to self-produce the remainder of the record in Philadelphia with engineer Keith Abrams. "Something we took from working with Congleton was ideas on arranging songs," Grote explains, and they certainly learned a lot: Popular Manipulations is a raucous and impressively thick-sounding album, overflowing with toothy melodies that pack a serious punch.

The distinctly intense sound of Popular Manipulations -- charging guitars, thunderous drumming, and Grote's searing vocals -- was brought on by a few cited influences, from shoegaze's aggressive swirl to the Velvet Underground's impeccable drone-rock sound. There's a distinctly Canadian flavor to this brand of indie rock, too; Spencer Krug's anthemic, lushly inscrutable work in Wolf Parade and his defunct Sunset Rubdown side project comes to mind, as does 2000s Toronto barnburners the Diableros' overlooked 2006 gem You Can't Break the Strings in Our Olympic Hearts.

But don't mistake easy comparisons for a lack of originality: on Popular Manipulations, the District are in a lane entirely their own, exploring lyrical themes of isolation and abandonment in a way that ups the music's already highly charged emotional quotient. "Capable" finds Grote turning his focus to the ruinous aftermath of divorce, and "Before I Wake" is, in his words, "About coming to terms with being isolated or alone -- even though we have a whole group of voices singing the whole time." Grote explains that even the title of the record touches on these universal concerns: "It hints at how people use each other, for good or bad, and the personal ways you manipulate yourself and other people in day-to-day interactions."

For such weighty thematic material, though, Popular Manipulations is purely life-affirming rock music, bursting with energy that cuts through the darkness of the world that surrounds us. "We're a much better distillation of who we wish to be as a band," Grote reflects on the journey that has led the Districts to this point. "We've figured out how to distill the things we've been trying to accomplish as a band, musically and lyrically. We've always viewed making music as something we're trying to do better the whole time." Mission accomplished.
Lithuania - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Lithuania
Eric Slick and Dominic Angelella have been collaborating as Lithuania for about a decade, and yet until recently they've only had an EP (Heavy Hands) and a 7" (Domesticated God) to show. The two friends are infinitely busy—Slick plays drums in Dr. Dog and Angelella writes songs for DRGN KING—but they finally orchestrated the time to record their first full-length album aptly titled Hardcore Friends, being released by Lame-O Records this August. 

Slick and Angelella first met in the jazz program at University of the Arts in Philadelphia and quickly realized they were the oddballs amongst their classical peers. They immediately connected through mutual musical interests like Husker Du, Captain Beefheart, Boredoms, and Bjork. Dom would take Eric to basement punk shows in West Philly, while Eric would take Dom to the Avant Gentleman's Lodge, a defunct venue that catered to the Philadelphia art scene. Eventually the two began playing music together and started a conversation about bad band names. "We've been a songwriting duo this whole time," said Eric. "When [Dom] said Lithuania I thought, 'Oh, it's like that no man is an island thing.' No man is an island, so two men are a country, and I thought that was hilarious." They began playing shows around Philadelphia and went on a short tour last May. 

Recorded in five days by Joe Reinhart and Kyle Pulley at The Headroom Studios in Philadelphia, Hardcore Friends spans the last ten years of their friendship. "It's an old perspective," says Angelella. "All of those early songs are from or about five years ago. It's this thing where you're a completely different person. It's cool to update it to now." 

Writing Hardcore Friends was a completely contrasting experience for the two: Angelella was used to being the sole songwriter in DRGN KING while Eric was usually playing drums in a band. The first half of the album contains older songs from 2007 when Slick was staying with friends in Asheville and emailing song ideas to Angelella in Philadelphia. The second half is all brand new songs written over the past year. "It's sort of like this chronological narrative of our friendship," says Slick. "In the past year we've gone through some heavy stuff—family stuff, relationship stuff—and it was pretty wild. We finished up this album with a wiser perspective on the first half of it. We even sequenced it so it would tell that story." 

Hardcore Friends opens with the pop-fueled and fleeting "God in Two Persons," moved along by Slick's reflective vocals and racked drumming. "Pieces," the first single off the album, is a solid anthem with unshakeable guitars and genuine lyrics that invoke the likes of Stephen Malkmus and Archers of Loaf. Aside from their mastered melodious punk style, Lithuania is just as capable of writing a dawdling and quiet song like "Coronation Day," showing their softer side with acoustic guitars, synthesizers, and Angelella's mollifying vocals. The album closes with "Hardcore Friends," a mid-tempo anthem with guest vocals from friends Frances Quinlan (Hop Along) and Rachel Browne (Field Mouse). It's a culmination of what the rest of the tracks have been leading up to: a resilient friendship that resonates in the face of failure and heartache, and prevails sonically.
Pine Barons - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Pine Barons
Born among the pitch pines of southern New Jersey, Pine Barons is a project that came to fruition as friends gathered around campfires in the nature-rich environments of their hometowns. The band’s beginnings can be traced back to lead vocalist and guitarist, Keith Abrams, and drummer, Collin Smith, meeting in preschool and eventually playing in a series of bands together, getting to know their instruments in their parents’ basements as well as outdoors, adventuring around, exploring an eclectic and intimate palette of punk, jazz and psychedelic rock.

Combining forces with guitar player, Brad Pulley, bassist, Shane Hower and keyboardist, Alex Beebe, the full Pine Barons lineup formed in 2012. New material blended the raw, lo-fi energy of those early days with an infusion of folk, roots and emo. Releasing their first EP in 2013, songs such as “Smile America” and “Carnival” would prove the songwriting and lyrical abilities of these young musicians and set the stage for the next evolution of their multifaceted sound. In one particular instance, the band dripped coffee on a cassette tape to achieve a deteriorating production quality, acutely aware of how such sonic choices would affect the listener from an early stage.

Five years after the group’s formation, Pine Barons proudly unveils their debut LP, The Acchin Book. Eleven tracks of nuanced and emotional rock, the breadth of the band’s collective imagination shines through cohesively and unabashedly. Recorded in Philadelphia at Headroom Studios, songs like “Clowns” and “Hourcoat” masterfully navigate complex rhythms and impassioned vocals, combined with memorable melodies and jazzy flourishes. The nostalgic yet forward-thinking qualities of groups like Animal Collective, Modest Mouse and Velvet Underground come to mind as the record unravels.

Much of The Acchin Book’s unique quality comes from the auxiliary instruments and recording techniques used; feathered paper dragged across paintings, field recordings in the woods at night, accordion, string arrangements and bowed guitars all contributing to the various moods and textures of the record. The songs comprise a collective of philosophical vignettes, each track inhabiting a different setting while dealing with intertwined anxieties about living one’s life and trying to be a good person. While endlessly relatable, it’s a record that could only have been made by these five individuals, whose paths crossing are as much a part of the story as any other found in The Acchin Book.
Venue Information:
Johnny Brenda's
1201 N. Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA, 19125
http://www.johnnybrendas.com/