Bardo Pond, Kinski

Johnny Brenda's Presents

Bardo Pond

Kinski

Kohoutek

Fri, October 30, 2015

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12.00

This event is 21 and over

All shows are 21+ Proper I.D. required for admission

Bardo Pond - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
Bardo Pond
The world’s most essential psychedelic rock experience should defy rational explanation and scholarly deconstruction. No tablature can define for you what these latter day cosmic couriers bring to the table, no lyric sheet will give you access to their text; you put the music on, close your eyes, and dream your equivalent of the pond into existence. Bardo Pond has the outward specifications of a rock band — guitars, bass, keyboards, drums, occasional but crucial flute and violin and vocals — but the rivers that converge into the band’s oneiric flow have their headwaters in the outlands of ecstatic jazz, free noise and the avant-garde. Their slow-motion avalanches of churning instrumentation and voice suggest drugged states but don’t necessarily require them.
They alter brain chemistry by the alchemical effect of distressed sound alone, aspiring to become engineers of the soul’s passage to alternate states of consciousness.

At the foundation of the pyramid, the drums of Jason Kourkounis and the bass of Clint Takeda lay down a sinewy, sexy and hypnagogic bottom end. At the centre of the pyramid, the twin guitars of John and Michael Gibbons send out emissaries of fire, flaying flesh from bone in a storm of holy liberation. Isobel Sollenberger inhabits the place where the pyramid meets the eye of their storm, weaving fibres of voice, flute and violin through the din.

I heard someone comment recently that the limits of music have now been defined, bracketed by John Cage’s silence at one end and Merzbow’s maximum noise at the other, leaving only the option of filling the spaces in between. Bardo Pond demonstrate how much scope there is to innovate within that continuum. If rock music is to have any relevance in the new millennium, it is bands like Bardo Pond that will make it so.
Kinski - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Kinski
Sometimes you just want to play FASTER. For a band whose extensive discography has historically been primarily instrumental and prone to modifying adjectives like "post-" and "space-", the last couple of years have been a left turn down a twisted alley of fuzz pedals, blown tube amps, and a kind of raw power befitting of the Stooges. There are quiet moments here and there but you get the feeling they're only there so the drummer can catch his breath. 7 (or 8) finds Kinski sounding heavier, faster, and even more self-assured, picking up where 2013's Cosy Moments left off but also pushing their sound into even more singular territory.

7 (or 8), the title itself a wry observation echoing the confusion created by their extensive catalog, is in fact their SEVENTH (or eighth depending who you ask) LP and second for new label home Kill Rock Stars, having previously released several LPs on Sub Pop and other discerning independent labels. Recorded and mixed in San Francisco at El Studio with Phil Manley (of Trans Am), 7 (or 8) comes in the midst of a more prolific period for the band. "It always takes us awhile to write a record but this one came quickly. We've stopped worrying about it so much and just get on with it, which is easier on the soul," says guitarist/singer Chris Martin. This mindset, alongside their newfound lyricism, has revealed a band that is slyly self-aware, hinted at through years of tongue-in-cheek song titles but now fully evident. The quicker pace has also instilled a palpable confidence and energy on record.

That being said, 7 (or 8) hits like a ton of bricks. The double helping of riffs in the form of "Detroit Trickle Down" and "Flight Risk" leave the listener nearly out of breath. Martin, Lucy Atkinson (Bass), Matthew Reid-Schwartz (Guitar), and Barrett Wilke (Drums) stretch out a bit over the course of the record, marrying their more expansive sound with proto-punk fury, but they rarely let up until the last song, album highlight "Bulletin of the International String Figure Association". One of the last songs written for the record, "Bulletin..." eases into a nearly 11 minute crescendo of rock bliss, gently flirts with a string section at the same time, and then floats back down to Earth in a perfect denouement. Like John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands on the cover, Kinski strive to make art that is uncompromising and on their own terms and 7 (or 8) is a refreshing reminder that rock music in 2015 can still be a unique and cathartic experience.
Kohoutek - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Kohoutek
Since 2003, Mid-Atlantic improv collective Kohoutek, construct a dynamic stylistic range of abstract and textural sound, atmospheric rock, harsh noise freakouts, clattering percussion, guitar heroics, and alien electronics congealing to form a multihued psychedelic extravaganza. Kohoutek forge their own path in the improv universe as a burning fragment from a fleeting sonic comet.
Venue Information:
Johnny Brenda's
1201 N. Frankford Ave
Philadelphia, PA, 19125
http://www.johnnybrendas.com/